Placebo Wordz, paroles et traductions des chansons de Placebo

Nancy Boy, Placebo (Placebo lyrics, explanations and press quotes)

20 Janvier 2008 , Rédigé par Placebo Wordz Publié dans #ENGLISH PLACEBO

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Nancy Boy
(Placebo)
Lyrics and explanation


Nancy Boy 1 - Placebo Nancy Boy 2 - Placebo

Lyrics : Placebo
Nancy Boy
Alcoholic kind of mood
Lose my clothes,
Lose my lube
Cruising for a piece of fun
Looking out for number one
Different partner every night
So narcotic outta sight
What a gas, what a beautiful ass

And it all breaks down
At the role reversal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me
And it all breaks down
At the first rehearsal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me

Kind of buzz
That lasts for days
Had some help from insect ways
Comes across all shy and coy
Just another nancy boy
Woman man or modern monkey
Just another happy junkie
Fifty pounds, press my button
Going down

And it all breaks down
At the role reversal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me
And it all breaks down
At the first rehearsal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
he's coming over me

Does his make up in his room
Douse himself with cheap perfume
Eyeholes in a paper bag
Greatest lay I ever had
Kind of guy who mates for life
Gotta help him find a wife
We're a couple,
When our bodies double

And it all breaks down
At the role reversal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me
And it all breaks down
At the first rehearsal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me

And it all breaks down
At the role reversal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me
And it all breaks down
At the first rehearsal
Got the muse in my head :
She's universal
Spinning me round
She's coming over me
Press Quotes
PLACEBO
NANCY BOY
HUT

Brian (riffling the pile): "Are we supposed to review our single?" Why don't you review it? Yes, now. Here. For us."

MM (Deep breath) :"It's carnivorous. It's appetite on vinyl; it's the song playing in Brett Anderson's dreams in the fighting and f***ing sequences. Viciuous, greedy, lust-soaked, and the guitars swagger like an alley full of danger. And that spitefully pinched, shameless voice -angelic, filthy, and twitching like a whip-handle- makes it hit like a rush to the head.
Delicious."


Brian : "It's not a sober song. We tried to capture the sound of the character being both drug- and sex-crazed. There are times in your life when you're so off your head all you want to do is f***, and this doesn't promote promiscuity but it doesn't judge it either. It's a re-recorded track : it's the one track wich we didn't actually get right on the album, although it kind of hurts to say that cos I'm very proud of the album. We wanted something that was more instant, more punk, more like it sounds live. It pokes fun at macho classic phrases and attitudes. And words like "queer" and "fag" - you can reappropriate them, attach them to your own power."

Brian Molko, Stefan Olsdal, Melody Maker, January 04th 1997



"From a band whose androgynous lead singer Brian Molko is a strong focal point for their sexually ambiguous lyrics, “Nancy Boy” is the boldest statement yet.

“It’s not your run-of-the-mill, boy-meets-girl song,” Molko admits.

“Sonically, we tried to capture a kind of drug-induced sexual rush; it’s got a rising car sound which was meant to kind of reproduce the first rushes of E, and it’s obvious that the character in the song is kind of drug-crazed at that moment. There are times in your life where you are so off your head that all you really want to do is fuck.”

“It’s a celebration and a slag of that behaviour at the same time. It doesn’t promote promiscuity but it doesn’t judge it either.”

Molko continued: “It pokes fun at very macho, classic phrases - ‘I’d fuck her with a paper bad over my head’; ’Don’t look at the mantelpiece when you’re poking the fire,’ et cetera. And like with the words queer and fag, when you appropriate it for yourself, it starts to get attached with your own power. So that line about ‘Eyeholes in a paper bag, greatest lay I ever had’ - it’s just saying that the drag queen in the song is probably very ugly, but is attempting to reach some kind of beauty, twisted beauty, perverse beauty. I guess it’s sating you can be ugly and be an amazing lay; it doesn’t really matter.”

The song also “criticises people who think it’s fashionable to be gay - guys who think that because ‘some of my best friends are gay’ that they are going to try it out because they’re in a milieu where it’s cool, but they haven’t actually felt the desire themselves. In the song, I’m questioning people’s reasons for sleeping with people of the same sex. In the same way that heroin is very hip today, being bisexual seems to be very chic.”


Brian Molko, Melody Maker, January 1997



"D&C: "Nancy Boy" has been re-recorded and released. It’s a lot more intense.
BM: It’s trying to capture that certain point of an evening, or a certain point of intoxication when all you can do, or want to do, is fuck. It’s a celebration, but it also pokes fun at drug-induced promiscuity and that experimantation for experimantation’s sake. I’ve also been called ‘Nancy Boy’ a thousand times, so it’s about me as well."


Brian Molko, Dazed & Confused, March 1997



"It's not absurd," reasons Molko, "it's obscene. A song this rude should not be number four in the charts."


Brian Molko, Select, April 1997



"On ‘Nancy Boy,’ when you refer to cheap perfume, which sort do you mean? Are we talking Tweed, Charlie and Tramp, or do you maybe mean the Body Shop perfumes, which are the cheapest you can buy, but aren’t really that sleazy?
“Nah,” Brian giggles. “It’s that toilet-cleaner stuff that bad trannies wear. The stuff you can buy from market stalls in Deptford. Any more?”


Brian Molko, Select, October 1998



I think that there are many songs that don’t represent anymore our music but I don’t disown them. If I have to choose a song that I wish I hadn’t written, that would be Nancy Boy. Most of all, apart from the lyrics, I find it musically rude. The product of a twenty-two boys’ punk pop band that try to play with style without succeding in it. We gave up playing it for a long time, it was like our Creep (Radiohead), we couldn’t find anymore in feeling with that song. Lately, during our latest tour, we started again to put it in the setlist. We know that it’s a very important song for our fans, they related to it. We couldn’t deny it to them.


Brian Molko, All Music, November 2004



Q: Velveteenfaerie asks - “Everyone remembers Nancy Boy, but how do you feel about it now?”


Brian: The relationship we have, you know, towards Nancy Boy is very, very different to the relationship that everybody else has to it. To a lot of Placebo fans it’s a really, really important song and it’s kinda the way they discovered the band in 1996. They loved it so much they pushed it up to number 4 in the charts, which, you know, judging by its subject matter – transvestitism – we were extremely surprised. Now because it became such an identifying thing for
Placebo, we had to bury it for like four years and we refused categorically to play it live. But that was a real necessary thing for us because we thought that we’d be lying to our audiences if we were playing a song mechanically, if we felt that we had no emotional connections to it. And for a long time we didn’t. When it was time to do this whole singles compilation we realised that we’d have to exhume the corpse eventually, and because of the break, that sort of four year vacation from Nancy Boy, it actually became fun to play again.

Brian Molko, session at AOL 2004



Fender: "What were the first songs you ever remember writing?"
Stefan: "The first song I wrote was called “F--- Off And Die.” It was rubbish."
Brian: "The first real ones I guess were “
36 Degrees” and “Nancy Boy”."

Brian Molko, Stefan Olsdal, A Pint & A Chat Fender®, December 2006

Source : www.fender.co.uk



But talking of, erm, country matter, the one song on 'Placebo' which has kicked up the most wet leaves is the shuddering strop of 'Nancy Boy', a song about drugs, fetishes, a role reversal and erm, shagging with a bag on your head.

“That's a play on all those horrible macho jokes like 'You don't look at the mantlepiece while you're poking the fire!'” trills Molko.

“We're trying to subvert that with the line “Eyeholes in a paper bag/ Greatest lay I ever had”. It's all about gender confusion and transvestism, the lure of a second-hand beauty where imperfections and things that are really f—ed up are more attractive, the danger of it is a turn on.


Brian Molko, NME, 1996

Source : dittyditty.blogspot.com






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